Tag Archives: Photobook

Talking Picture no. 27: Peter Tatham by Daniel Meadows

A vertigo inducing movie from Daniel Meadows in Rochdale this week, and the book I will publish this Thursday matches it. Steeplejack 1976.

Talking Picture no. 27: Peter Tatham by Daniel Meadows

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I have been working on a new Café Royal site to try and combine the blog, archive and recent publications rather than have them in different places. So, here is the new site. I’ll be adding to the archive over time and for the next few weeks I’ll continue the blog here, but please start to follow the new blog,

http://www.caferoyalbooks.com/blog/

 

Homer Sykes—Biddy Boys Ireland 1972

This week’s publication is by Homer Sykes—Biddy Boys Ireland 1972. An edition of 150, 36 pages.

I have published several books by Sykes, the First being Blitz Kids, Skins and Silver Spoons. There are three more planned for this year.

From Homer:
My first documentary photographs date from the late 1960s, during 1970s – 1990s, my principal commissions in Britain were for what used to be called the “weekend colour supplements” such as The Telegraph, The Sunday Times, The Observer, You and the Sunday Express magazines. I also shot weekly news for Newsweek, Time, Now! and New Society magazines.

I always  worked on my own personal photographic documentary projects. These include work on aspects of British Society, and documenting traditional British folklore customs, that I started in 1970 and completed seven years later resulting in the publication Once a Year: Some Traditional British Customs (Gordon Fraser). I have in recent years been revisiting many of these annual events and finding ‘new’ annual customs that I had not photographed in the 1970s.

I am the  author, and co-author-photographer of eight books about Britain as well as Shanghai Odyssey (Dewi Lewis Publishing) and On the Road Again (Mansion Editions).

More recently Café Royal Books have published ten  limited editions books from my British archive.

My work is represented in private and National Collections.

I have had numerous exhibitions through out my career. A mini retrospective exhibition of ninety photograph, Homer Sykes England 1970-1980, was held at Maison de la Photographie Robert Doisneau, Paris for over three months in 2014. This was principally from my projects on aspects of British Society. I was the first British photographer to be shown there. There was a publication to go with the exhibit, Homer Sykes This is England  (Poursuite Editions), was published on the occasion of the exhibition.

My vintage prints are represented by the James Hyman Gallery London.

In the last 35 years I have gone from shooting about three editorial commissioned magazine stories a week, mainly one and two days assignments, to about one commission per annum. Which suits me fine, as 90% of my time is now taken up managing my archive, and shooting stuff that interests me.

Further reading.

My British Archive
Wikipedia
In conversation with Peter Dench
Photo Histories
PhotoShelter Blog
Biddy Boys

David Walker – Spectators

Today I published a book by David Walker called Spectators. As part of his proposal, David sent me some notes explaining the work. There are more posts planned for next year which present more of David’s work; work that wouldn’t fit in terms of a Café Royal publications but is still very relevant in terms of UK Social Documentary.

I began making photographs in 1983. I’d been working as an Art Director in Advertising since I left school at 15, and at the ripe old age of 35 I began to look and appreciate the work of Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Eugene Smith, Gary Winogrand, and Tony Ray-Jones.

I was working then as one half of a freelance concept team with a writer, which afforded me a little time to persue something that I desperately needed to do (photography). I purchased a Pentax LX some lenses and began to take photographs.

One of my great interests when I was younger was Speedway Racing, I needed something to get excited about so I visited Belle Vue to see what I could find. I discovered two madly dedicated fans, and found that after their permission they were so infatuated with the sport that they forgot about me poking my camera just inches away from their animated faces. ‘SPECTATORS’ was born right there.

I enjoyed an amazing amount of success for my first project by being shortlisted at the Photographers Gallery and had shows at Oldham Art Gallery, the then prestigious Turnpike Gallery, and a part show ‘City life’ at the Cornerhouse making the front cover of the Cornerhouse magazine.

There are interesting stories surrounding every image in the book. Here are four that relate to the images below.

Wimbledon:
I managed to acquire a ticket for the semi final between Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg from my wife’s boss.The character I photographed because he came from a wealthy background would be termed as eccentric, if he was from a lower class background would be labeled MAD. I was seriously restricted in my movement so I waited patiently for this character to react to the play, when Boris won a set he stood up and gestured to a friend with the thumbs up sign.

Football:
With this image, I managed to obtain a ticket from Newcastle so that I could be in the Newcastle PEN. It was Hades in there,”I was in danger of my life”. However I managed to complete several strong images before someone stood beside me, and said in his best Geordie accent “I think you’d better go now”. The image shown here (which was shown in the Centenary of the Football League Book under the slogan “We hate humans”) was taken before the game even started.

The World Cup Snooker Final:
I decided to put my own slant on this by photographing the final between the unknown finalist Joe Johnson and Steve Davies in a Working Mens Club in Failsworth. The tension can clearly be seen on the faces of the Pool players as they watched the final frame of the tournament on the tele in the corner of the room.

Ice Hockey:
This was a very difficult shoot. I shot in several different areas before I realised that when the players were taking ‘A time out’
that they themselves became Spectators of their own sport.

Spectators by David Walker
27.11.14
36 pages
14cm x 20cm
b/w digital
Edition of 150

£7.00 available from Café Royal Books

All images © David Walker. Publication © Café Royal Books.

The Photobook: A History

I was lucky enough to take part in the first Bristol Photobook Weekend last June. Hosted by Rudi Thoemmes from RRB photobooks and Martin Parr.

This film The Photobook: A History was made the following day, and repeats some of what was discussed at Bristol. It refers mainly via the series of books of the same name, written by Parr and Badger, to the new history of photobooks that is being created but that as yet is under documented. It’s well worth the 83 minutes it’ll take you to watch it!

At some point I might expand on each volume of this book but there is a lot of that online already. I found it interesting to hear the nine elements Gerry Badger initially refers to, as a basis for volume three, each of which could be a basis for further research. Propaganda; protest; desire; society; place; conflict; memory and identity. The ninth is the medium itself, which to my mind enters into the ‘artist’s book’.

Martin Parr photographer and photobook collector, Gerry Badger critic photographer and architect, and Hannah Watson Director of Trolley Books, in conversation with Simon Baker Curator of photography and international art at Tate.http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f9?isVid=1&isUI=1